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INTRODUCTION

ABIM MOC Activity ID

12/18/2018 - Medical Grand Rounds: Lung Transplantation for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Using Genetics to Guide Personalized Transplant Therapies

QUIZ

EVALUATION

CERTIFICATE

INTRODUCTION

Credit Hours: CME 1.00

Target Audience:

Faculty, residents, fellows, and community physicians in General Internal Medicine and subspecialties.

Educational Objectives:

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Review the average survival rates from diagnosis and progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.
  • Recognize that lung transplant is the only curative therapy for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and the most common indication for LTxp in North America.
  • Explain how primary immune deficiency diseases ( CVID, CGD) may lead to pulmonary failure.
  • Describe sequential LTX and BMT from the same donor permits planned withdrawal of immunosuppression leading to tolerance
  • Increase awareness that cadaveric vertebral bone marrow contains functional hematological stem cells suitable for BMT.
  • Review telomere-mediated disease and their clinical presentation
  • Demonstrate the importance of genetics and potential use of whole genome sequencing in identifying patients with telomere-mediated disease
  • Describe the mechanistic consequences of telomere-mediated disease and their likely co-morbidities.

Suggested Additional Reading:

  1. Notarangelo et al. Respiration. 2007;74(3):264
  2. Szabolcs et al. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2015 Feb;135(2):567
  3. Szabolcs et al. J Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2012 Jan;18(1 Suppl):S193
  4. Ferrebee et al. Blood 14:140, 1959
  5. Popescu, Mannem et al. AJRCCM 2018
  6. Armanios M, Blackburn EH. The telomere syndromes. Nat Rev Genet. 2012
  7. Mathai SK, et al. Pulmonary Fibrosis in the era of stratified medicine. Thorax. 2016
  8. Armanios M. Telomeres and age-related disease: how telomere biology informs clinical paradigms. J Clin Invest. 2013

Authors:
John McDyer, MD — Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Director, Lung Transplantation Translational Research Program, University of Pittsburgh
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Jonathan Alder, PhD — Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Paul Szabolcs, MD — Professor, Pediatrics and Immunology Chief, Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapies, University of Pittsburgh
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Authors disclosure of relevant financial relationships with any entity producing, marketing, re-selling, or distributing health care goods or services, used on, or consumed by, patients is listed above. No other planners, members of the planning committee, content reviewers and/or anyone else in a position to control the content of this education activity have relevant financial relationships to disclose.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The University of Pittsburgh is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution.