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INTRODUCTION

2019 Spring Trauma Grand Rounds

EVALUATION

CERTIFICATE

INTRODUCTION

Credit Hours: CME 0.50

Target Audience:

This activity is intended for emergency, family, osteopathic, trauma, surgical, and general practice physicians and nurses who have contact with trauma patients.

Educational Objectives:

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Identify the populations most at risk for frostbite.
  • Improve diagnostic skills for identifying fourth degree frostbite.
  • Increase patient outcomes by identifying the mainstay of treatment for frostbite.
  • Closely follow recommended processes and procedures for evaluating previously asymptomatic patients.
  • Improve diagnostic skills for identifying BCVI.
  • Increase patient outcomes by identifying the screen criteria for BCVI.
  • Improve management skills for trauma care providers regarding forensic evidence
  • Improve forensics evaluation skills for trauma care providers.

Presentation Topics
Title: Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis for the Treatment of Frostbite
Presenter: Steven Tamesis, MD, Shantanu Warhadpande, MD, Jenny Ziembicki, MD, and Alain Corcos, MD


Title: Trauma Forensics: Saving Lives and Preserving Evidence
Presenter: Louis Alarcon, MD, and Jeffrey Nine, MD


Title: Trauma Care for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injuries
Presenters: Shelly Reynolds-Hill, MD, and Lindsey Roach, DO

Suggested Additional Reading:

  1. Flatt A. “Frostbite.” Baylor University Medical Center Proceedings. (2010): 23(3): 261-262.
  2. Herndon D, Jones JH. Total Burn Care. 4th Ed. Philadelphia: Saunders Elsevier. (2012): 449-453.
  3. Cameron JL, Cameron A. Current Surgical Therapy. 12th Ed. Philadelphia: Saunders Elsevier. (2017): 1298-1303.
  4. Imray C, Grieve A, Dhillon S, Caudwell Xtreme Everest Research Group. “Cold damage to the extremities: frostbite and non-freezing cold injuries.” Postgraduate Medical Journal. 85(1007):481-8. Sept. 2009.
  5. Handford C, Buxton P, Russell K, et al. “Frostbite: a practical approach to hospital management.” Extreme Physiology & Medicine. 2014;3:7. Doi:10.1186/2046-7648-3-7.
  6. McIntosh SE, Opacic M, Freer L, Grissom CK, Auerbach PS, Rodway GW, Cochran A, Giesbrecht GG, McDevitt M, Imray CH, Johnson EL, Dow J, Hackett PH, Wilderness Medical Society. “Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of frostbite: 2014 update.” Wilderness & Environmental Medicine. 2014-12-01, Volume 25, Issue 4: 543-554.
  7. Ziembicki J, et al. UPMC Mercy Trauma and Burn Services Practice Guidelines. (2018): 1-6.
  8. Warhadpande S, et al. “A structured protocol for catheter-directed thrombolysis for severe digital frostbite with angiographic response as a predictive factor for amputation rates: experience with six consecutive patients.” SIR Annual Scientific Meeting: Los Angeles, CA. March 17-22, 2018.
  9. Biffl, Walter L., et al. "Western Trauma Association Critical Decisions in Trauma: Screening for and Treatment of Blunt Cerebrovascular Injuries." The Journal of TRAUMA Injury, Infection, and Critical Care. 67(6): 1150-1153. (Dec. 2009).Orlowski, Hilary L.P., et al. "Utility of CT Angiography in Screening for Traumatic Cerebrovascular Injury." Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery. 172:27-30. (2018).
  10. Bromberg, William J. et al. "Blunt Cerebrovascular Inury Practice Management Guidelines: The Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma." The Journal of TRAUMA Injury, Infection, and Critical Care. 68(2): 471-477. (Feb. 2010).
  11. Mattox, KL, Mitchell SA. Trauma, Medicine and the Law, in Moore EE, Feliciano DV, Mattox KL (ed): Trauma (8th Edition), Ch 54. New York, McGraw-Hill, 2017.
  12. DiMario VJ. Gunshot Wounds: Practical Aspects of Firearms, Ballistics and Forensic Techniques. 2nd ed. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 1999.
  13. Wecht CH, Graham MA, Hanzlick RL. Forensic Pathology in Civil & Criminal Cases. 4th edition. Juris Publishing, Inc.; 2017.

Authors:
Alain Corcos, MD, FACS — Chief of the Division of Multisystem Trauma in the Department of Surgery at UPMC Mercy. Trauma medical director, Academic Chief of Surgical Residency, and Head of the Section of Surgical Critical Care. Clinical Assistant Professor of Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh.
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Jeffrey Nine, MD — Chief of UPMC Autopsy Services and Professor of Pathology at the University of Pittsburgh.
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Jenny Ziembicki, MD — Medical director of the UPMC Mercy Burn Center.
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Lindsey K. Roach, DO — Trauma attending physician at UPMC Hamot.
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Louis Alarcon, MD, FACS, FCCM, — Medical director of Trauma Surgery at UPMC Presbyterian and Co-director of the UPMC Patient Blood Management Program. He is also a professor in the department of Surgery and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Shantanu Warhadpande, MD — PGY-3 Resident in the UPMC Diagnostic Radiology program.
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Shelley B. Reynolds-Hill, MD — Trauma attending physician, UPMC Hamot
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Steven Tamesis, MD — PGY- 3 Resident in the UPMC Mercy General Surgery program.
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Authors disclosure of relevant financial relationships with any entity producing, marketing, re-selling, or distributing health care goods or services, used on, or consumed by, patients is listed above. No other planners, members of the planning committee, content reviewers and/or anyone else in a position to control the content of this education activity have relevant financial relationships to disclose.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The University of Pittsburgh is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution.