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INTRODUCTION

Effective Engagement: How Motivational Interviewing Can Help Engage Adolescents in Primary Care

QUIZ

EVALUATION

CERTIFICATE

INTRODUCTION

Credit Hours: CME 1.00

Target Audience:

Primary & specialty care physcians, nurses, medical assistants, social workers, and office staff

Educational Objectives:

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Identify the core concepts and processes of motivational interviewing when promoting behavior change.
  • Identify essential skills for motivational interviewing
  • Identify the importance of staff-wide training and office culture change in developing effective environments for motivation interviewing

Joint Sponsor Statement - Note: This Accreditation Statement Supersedes All Other Statements
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Pennsylvania Chapter American Academy of Pediatrics. The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.


The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring materials activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits'. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.


Other health care professionals are awarded .10 continuing education units (CEUs), which are equal to 1.0 contact hours. Faculty for this activity have been requested to identify significant financial or other relationships with manufacturer(s) of any commercial product(s) or with provider(s) of any commercial service(s) which might affect the balance of their presentation.

Suggested Additional Reading:

  • Reno et al (2018), Improving Provider Communication about HIV Vaccines for Vaccine-Hesitant Parents through the use of Motivational Interviewing, J Health Commun, 23(4): 313-320
  • Dempsey et al (2018), Effect of a Health Care Professional Communication Training Intervention on Adolescent Human Papillomavirus Vaccination, JAMA Pediatr, 172(5), 

Authors:
Prantik Saha, MD, MPH — Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, Member, Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT)
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Authors disclosure of relevant financial relationships with any entity producing, marketing, re-selling, or distributing health care goods or services, used on, or consumed by, patients is listed above. No other planners, members of the planning committee, content reviewers and/or anyone else in a position to control the content of this education activity have relevant financial relationships to disclose.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The University of Pittsburgh is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution.