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INTRODUCTION

2/4/2020 - Medical Grand Rounds: Resident Research Presentations

QUIZ

EVALUATION

CERTIFICATE

INTRODUCTION

Credit Hours: CME 1.00

Target Audience:

Faculty, residents, fellows, and community physicians in General Internal Medicine and subspecialties.

Educational Objectives:

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Recognize the role of biologics in the treatment of IBD
  • Describe the difference between conventional medications and biologics
  • Analyze how biomarkers may predict response to a biologic
  • Recognize the beneficial role of cardiac rehab for patients across the spectrum of CVD
  • Determine the role of flipped classroom in the GME setting
  • Describe dipyridamole therapy and how it can result in regulation of gut mucosal immunity via modulation of adenosine signaling.
  • Evaluate brain metastases in NSCLC

Resident Research Presentations
Can Cardiac Rehabilitation Improve Frailty in Older Adults with Cardiovascular Disease?
Andrew Lutz, MD

Increasing extracellular adenosine using dipyridamole modulates gut mucosal immunity among people living with HIV
Christina Mallarino-Haeger, MD

From Biomarkers to Biologics: Personalized Medicine in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Thien-Bao Peter Nguyen, MD

Impact of a Flipped Classroom Cardiology Consults Curriculum on Internal Medicine Residents’ Knowledge and Preparedness
Jenna Skowronski, MD

The HGF/MET/TWIST1 signaling axis: A targetable pathway for NSCLC brain metastases
Maria Velez, MD

Suggested Additional Reading:

  1. Afilalo J, Karunananthan S, Eisenberg MJ, Alexander KP, Bergman H. Role of frailty in patients with cardiovascular disease. Am J Cardiol 2009;103:1616-21.
  2. Collard RM, Boter H, Schoevers RA, Oude Vhosaar RC. Prevalence of frailty in community-dwelling older persons: a systematic review. J Am Geriatr Soc 2012;60:1487-92.
  3. Afilalo J, Alexander KP, Mack MJ, et al. Frailty Assessment in the Cardiovascular Care of Older Adults. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014;63(8):747-762
  4. Macatangay et al. CROI 2019.
  5. Schouten, L.J., Rutten, J., Huveneers, H.A.M. and Twijnstra, A. (2002), Incidence of brain metastases in a cohort of patients with carcinoma of the breast, colon, kidney, and lung and melanoma. Cancer, 94: 2698-2705. doi:10.1002/cncr.10541
  6. Jill Allenbaugh, Carla Spagnoletti, and Kathryn Berlacher (2019) Effects of a Flipped Classroom Curriculum on Inpatient Cardiology Resident Education. Journal of Graduate Medical Education: April 2019, Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 196-201.
  7. Lichtenstein, Gary R, et al. “ACG Clinical Guideline: Management of Crohnʼs Disease in Adults.” American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 113, no. 4, 2018, pp. 481–517., doi:10.1038/ajg.2018.27.
  8. Rubin, David T., et al. “ACG Clinical Guideline: Ulcerative Colitis in Adults.” The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 114, no. 3, 2019, pp. 384–413., doi:10.14309/ajg.0000000000000152.
  9. Click, Benjamin, et al. “Peripheral Eosinophilia in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Defines an Aggressive Disease Phenotype.” American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 112, no. 12, 2017, pp. 1849–1858., doi:10.1038/ajg.2017.402.

Authors:
Andrew Lutz, MD — PGY-3, Internal Medicine Resident, UPMC
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Christina Mallarino-Haeger, MD — PGY-3, Internal Medicine Resident, UPMC
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Jenna Skowronski, MD — PGY-3 - Internal Medicine Resident, UPMC
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Maria Velez, MD — PGY-3 - Internal Medicine Resident, UPMC
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Thien-Bao Peter Nguyen, MD — PGY-2 - Internal Medicine Resident, UPMC
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Authors disclosure of relevant financial relationships with any entity producing, marketing, re-selling, or distributing health care goods or services, used on, or consumed by, patients is listed above. No other planners, members of the planning committee, content reviewers and/or anyone else in a position to control the content of this education activity have relevant financial relationships to disclose.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The University of Pittsburgh is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution.