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INTRODUCTION

ABIM MOC Activity ID

10/27/2020 - Medical Grand Rounds: Cardiology Year in Review

QUIZ

EVALUATION

CERTIFICATE

INTRODUCTION

Credit Hours: CME 1.25

Target Audience:

Faculty, residents, fellows, and community physicians in General Internal Medicine and subspecialties.

Educational Objectives:

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Discuss new data on SGLT-2 inhibitors.
  • Review updated Guideline Directed Medical Therapy in Heart Failure
  • Introduce a new potential breakthrough in heart transplantation- Deceased Donor Hearts
  • Describe new atherectomy modality.
  • Describe new percuaneous tricuspid valve intervention.
  • Review the cardiac manifestation of COVID-19 and post-infection cardiac management
  • Examine the indications for icosapent ethyl use among high-risk patients with elevated triglycerides
  • Improve AF patient care by illustrating impact of catheter ablation on quality of life and role of wearable devices in monitoring AF.
  • Improve diagnostic skills by highlighting role of artifical intellegence in cardiac electrophysiology
  • Improve patient outcomes by demostrating advances in cardiac device technology including ICDs and leadless pacemakers

Suggested Additional Reading & Joint Sponsor Statement - Note: This Accreditation Statement Supersedes All Other Statements :

Suggested additional reading:

  1. Cardiovascular and Renal Outcomes with Empagliflozin in Heart Failure. EMPEROR Trial. Packer, et. al. N Engl J Med 2020; 383:1413-1424 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa2022190
  2. Dapagliflozin in Patients with Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction (DAPA HF). McMurray, et. al. N Engl J Med 2019; 381:1995-2008. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1911303
  3. Association of Optimal Implementation of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitor therapy with Outcome for Patients with Heart Failure. Bassi, Ziaeian, Yancy, Fonarow. JAMA Cardiol. 2020;5(8):948-951. DOI:10.1001/jamacardio.2020.0898
  4. Rajpal S, Tong MS, Borchers J, et al. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Findings in Competitive Athletes Recovering From COVID-19 Infection. JAMA Cardiol. Published online September 11, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2020.4916
  5. Phelan D, Kim JH, Chung EH. A Game Plan for the Resumption of Sport and Exercise After Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Infection. JAMA Cardiol. 2020;5(10):1085–1086. doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2020.2136
  6. Shi S, Qin M, Shen B, et al. Association of Cardiac Injury With Mortality in Hospitalized Patients With COVID-19 in Wuhan, China. JAMA Cardiol. 2020;5(7):802–810. doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2020.0950
  7. Puntmann VO, Carerj ML, Wieters I, et al. Outcomes of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients Recently Recovered From Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). JAMA Cardiol. Published online July 27, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2020.3557
  8. Bhatt DL, Steg PG, Miller M, et al; REDUCE-IT Investigators. Cardiovascular Risk Reduction with Icosapent Ethyl for Hypertriglyceridemia. N Engl J Med. 2019 Jan 3;380(1):11-22. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1812792. Epub 2018 Nov 10. PMID: 30415628.
  9. Bhatt DL, Miller M, Brinton EA, et al., REDUCE-IT Investigators. REDUCE-IT USA: Results From the 3146 Patients Randomized in the United States. Circulation. 2020 Feb 4;141(5):367-375. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.119.044440. Epub 2019 Nov 11. PMID: 31707829; PMCID: PMC7004453.
  10. Packer DL, Mark DB, Robb RA, Monahan KH, Bahnson TD, Poole JE, Noseworthy PA, Rosenberg YD, Jeffries N, Mitchell LB, et al.; CABANA Investigators. Effect of catheter ablation vs antiarrhythmic drug therapy on mortality, stroke, bleeding, and cardiac arrest among patients with atrial fibrillation: the CABANA randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2019; 321:1261–1274. doi: 10.1001/jama.2019.0693
  11. Boersma LV, Ince H, Kische S, Pokushalov E, Schmitz T, Schmidt B, Gori T, Meincke F, Protopopov AV, Betts T, et al.; following investigators and institutions participated in the EWOLUTION Study. Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol. 2019; 12:e006841. doi: 10.1161/CIRCEP.118.006841
  12. Mazzanti A, Tenuta E, Marino M, et al.. Efficacy and limitations of quinidine in patients with Brugada syndrome. Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol. 2019; 12:e007143.
Joint Providership Statement: In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by the University of Pittsburgh and . The University of Pittsburgh is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.
The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material activity for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits'. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
Other health care professionals will receive a certificate of attendance confirming the number of contact hours commensurate with the extent of participation in this activity.

Authors:
Aditya Bhonsale, MBBS, MD, MHS — Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Gavin Hickey, MD — Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology
Medical Director, VAD and Transplant Program, UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute
Program Director, UPMC Advanced Heart Failure/Transplant and Pulmonary Hypertension Fellowship Program
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Jeffrey Fowler, DO, FACC, FSCAI — Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Malamo Countouris, MD — Clinical Instructor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Authors disclosure of relevant financial relationships with any entity producing, marketing, re-selling, or distributing health care goods or services, used on, or consumed by, patients is listed above. No other planners, members of the planning committee, content reviewers and/or anyone else in a position to control the content of this education activity have relevant financial relationships to disclose.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The University of Pittsburgh is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution.