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INTRODUCTION

ABIM MOC Activity ID

2/9/2021 - Medical Grand Rounds: Special K-Club Series: Muc-ing around with minerals, TeleRecovery and the Role of Regnase-1 in host immunity against bacterial infections

QUIZ

EVALUATION

CERTIFICATE

INTRODUCTION

Credit Hours: CME 1.00

Target Audience:

Faculty, residents, fellows, and community physicians in General Internal Medicine and subspecialties.

Muc-ing around with minerals: the influence of Mucin1 on calcium and magnesium homeostasis
Presented by: Evan Ray, MD, PhD - Assistant Professor of Medicine, Renal-Electrolyte Division

TeleRecovery: Towards Scalable Transitional Rehabilitation for Older Critical Illness Survivors in Rural Communities
Presented by: Leslie Scheunemann, MD, MPH - Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine and Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine

Role of Regnase-1 in host immunity against bacterial infections
Presented by: Giraldina Trevejo-Nunez, MD - Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases

Educational Objectives:

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Explain how to improve diagnosis of hypomagnesemia by understanding the poor negative predictive value of a normal plasma Mg test.
  • State ways to improve practioners' understanding of when assessing for hypomagnesemia may be necessaryDescribe how to make providers aware of new tools available for management of hypomagnesemia.
  • Identify domains of functional impairment in the post-intensive care syndrome
  • Identify patients' priorities for participation in meaningful activities during recovery after critical illness.
  • Identify a range of barriers and facilitators for patients to participate in meaningful activities after critical illness.
  • Recognize knowledge gaps for how to optimize care delivery for functionally impaired critical illness survivors.
  • Describe the primary immune response upon pathogen entry into the lung.
  • Identify and highlight the importance of RNA binding proteins in controlling inflammatory response.
  • Recognize the role of IkappaB-zeta as an important regulator of inflammatory response.

Suggested Additional Reading & Joint Accreditation Statement - Note: This Accreditation Statement Supersedes All Other Statements:

Suggested additional reading:

  1. Iwasaki A, Foxman EF, Molony RD.Early local immune defences in the respiratory tract. Nat Rev Immunol. 2017 Jan;17(1):7-20. doi: 10.1038/nri.2016.117. PMID: 27890913
  2. Matsushita K, Takeuchi O, Standley DM, Kumagai Y, Kawagoe T, Miyake T, Satoh T, Kato H, Tsujimura T, Nakamura H, Akira S. Zc3h12a is an RNase essential for controlling immune responses by regulating mRNA decay. Nature. 2009 Apr 30;458(7242):1185-90. doi: 10.1038/nature07924.
  3. Okabe Y, Medzhitov R. Tissue biology perspective on macrophages. Nat Immunol. 2016 Jan;17(1):9-17. doi: 10.1038/ni.3320. PMID: 26681457
  4. IkappaB-zeta: an inducible regulator of nuclear factor-kappaB. Muta T. Vitam Horm. 2006;74:301-16. doi: 10.1016/S0083-6729(06)74012-2. PMID: 17027520
  5. Scheunemann LP, White JS, Prinjha S, et al. Post-ICU Care: A Qualitative Analysis of Patient Priorities and Implications for Redesign. Annals Am Thorac Soc. 2020 Feb;17(2):221-228. PMID: 31726016.
  6. Scheunemann LP, Leland NE, Perera S, et al. Sex Disparities and Functional Outcomes after Critical Illness. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2020 Apr;201(7):869-72. PMID: 31751152.
  7. Scheunemann LP, Girard TD, Leland NE. Epidemiologic Models and the Concept of Caring for Critically Ill Older Adults. Crit Care Med. 2021 Feb;49(2):375-379; PMID: 33438978.
  8. Skidmore ER, Dawson DR, Butters MA, et al. Strategy Training Shows Promise for Addressing Disability in the First 6 Months After Stroke. Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2015 Aug;29(7):668-76. doi: 10.1177/1545968314562113.
  9. PMID: 32734255, 25540137, 18562569, 25886283
  10. Naylor MD, Shaid EC, Carpenter D, Gass B, Levine C, Li J, Malley A, McCauley K, Nguyen HQ, Watson H, Brock J, Mittman B, Jack B, Mitchell S, Callicoatte B, Schall J, Williams MV. Components of Comprehensive and Effective Transitional Care. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 Jun;65(6):1119-1125. doi: 10.1111/jgs.1478

Joint Accreditation Statement
In support of improving patient care, the University of Pittsburgh is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit[s]™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. This educational activity is approved for 1.0 contact hours.

Other health care professionals will receive a certificate of attendance confirming the number of contact hours commensurate with the extent of participation in this activity.

Authors:
Evan Ray, MD, PhD — Assistant Professor of Medicine, Renal-Electrolyte Division, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Giraldina Trevejo-Nunez, MD — Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Leslie Scheunemann, MD, MPH — Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Authors disclosure of relevant financial relationships with any entity producing, marketing, re-selling, or distributing health care goods or services, used on, or consumed by, patients is listed above. No other planners, members of the planning committee, content reviewers and/or anyone else in a position to control the content of this education activity have relevant financial relationships to disclose.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The University of Pittsburgh is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution.