Step by Step

INTRODUCTION

NABP and DOB Data Collection

5/18/2021 - Medical Grand Rounds: Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition Year in Review

QUIZ

EVALUATION

CERTIFICATE

INTRODUCTION

Credit Hours: CME 1.00

Target Audience:

Faculty, residents, fellows, and community physicians in General Internal Medicine and subspecialties.

Tele-prehabilitation for liver transplant candidates
Presented by: Andres Duarte-Rojo, MD, PhD

COVID 19 Impact on Colorectal Cancer Screening: Challenges Ahead
Presented by: Jeffrey Dueker, MD, MPH

SARS-CoV-2 and PPE in the GI Lab: From Zero... to N95
Presented by: Asif Khalid, MD

Digital Behavioral Health Interventions for Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Presented by: David Levinthal, MD, PhD

Educational Objectives:

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Recognize the need for prehabilitation in liver transplant candidates
  • Describe current status of prehabilitation for liver transplant candidates
  • Design a proposal for tele-prehabilitation using technology aids
  • Explain the need for PPE during aerosol generating procedures
  • Recognize N95 related symptoms and underlying mechanisms
  • Recommend methods to mitigate N95 related symptoms and underlying mechanisms
  • Explain the linkage between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) severity and emotional function
  • Follow recommended IBS guidelines that encourage patient access to psychological treatments
  • Improve outcomes for patients with functional GI disorders by integrating digital behavioral health tools into patient care

Suggested Additional Reading & Joint Accreditation Statement - Note: This Accreditation Statement Supersedes All Other Statements:

Suggested additional reading:

  1. Duarte-Rojo A, Bloomer PM, Rogers RJ, et al. Introducing the smartphone app, EL-FIT (Exercise and Liver FITness), to help monitor and prehabilitate liver transplant candidates. Liver Transpl 2021;27:5102-12. PMID: 33232547.
  2. Lai JC, Sonnenday C, Tapper EB, et al. Frailty in Liver Transplantation: An expert opinion statement from the American Society of Transplantation Liver and Intestinal Community of Practice. Am J Transplant 2019;19:1896-906. PMID: 30980701.
  3. Chen HW, MD, Ferrando AA, White MG, et al. Home-based physical activity & diet intervention to improve physical function in advanced liver disease: A randomized pilot trial. Dig Dis Sci 2020 Jan; 65:3350-3359. PMID: 31907774.
  4. Chu DK, Akl EA, Duda S, et al. Physical distancing, face masks, and eye protection to prevent person-to-person transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The Lancet. 2020;395(10242):1973-87.
  5. Johnston ER, Habib-Bein N, Dueker JM, et al. Risk of bacterial exposure to the endoscopist’s face during endoscopy. Gastrointestinal endoscopy. 2019 Apr 1;89(4):818-24.
  6. Khalid A, Romutis S, Ibinson J, et. al. Acute physiological effects of N95 respirator use on gastroenterologists performing simulated colonoscopy. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 2021 Jan 23. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2021.01.017
  7. Lacy BE, Pimentel M, Brenner BM, Chey WD, Keefer LA, Long MD, Moshiree B. ACG Clinical Guideline: Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. American Journal of Gastroenterology 2021; 116:17-44.
  8. Laird KT, Tanner-Smith EE, Russell AC, et al. Short-term and long-term efficacy of psychological therapies for irritable bowel syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2016;14(7):937-947.
  9. Hunt M, Miguez S, Dukas B, Onwude O, White S. The Efficacy of Zemedy, a Mobile Digital Therapeutic for the Self-Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a Cross-Over, Randomized Controlled Trial. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth. 2021 Apr 14. doi: 10.2196/26152.
  10. Everitt HA, Landau S, O'Reilly G, Sibelli A, Hughes S, Windgassen S, Holland R, Little P, McCrone P, Bishop F, Goldsmith K, Coleman N, Logan R, Chalder T, Moss-Morris R; ACTIB trial group. Assessing telephone-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and web-delivered CBT versus treatment as usual in irritable bowel syndrome (ACTIB): a multicentre randomised trial. Gut. 2019;68(9):1613-1623.
  11. Everitt HA, Landau S, O'Reilly G, Sibelli A, Hughes S, Windgassen S, Holland R, Little P, McCrone P, Bishop FL, Goldsmith K, Coleman N, Logan R, Chalder T, Moss-Morris R. Cognitive behavioural therapy for irritable bowel syndrome: 24-month follow-up of participants in the ACTIB randomised trial.Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2019;4(11):863-872.

Joint Accreditation Statement
In support of improving patient care, the University of Pittsburgh is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit[s]™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. This educational activity is approved for 1.0 contact hours.

Other health care professionals will receive a certificate of attendance confirming the number of contact hours commensurate with the extent of participation in this activity.

Authors:
Andres Duarte-Rojo, MD, PhD — Associate Professor of Medicine, Medical Director of Liver Transplantation, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Asif Khalid, MD — Associate Professor of Medicine, Chief, GI Services - VAMC Pittsburgh, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
David Levinthal, MD, PhD — Director, Neurogastroenterology & Motility Center, Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Co-Director, UPMC Program for Gut Brain Health (PGH), Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Jeffrey Dueker, MD, MPH — Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Authors disclosure of relevant financial relationships with any entity producing, marketing, re-selling, or distributing health care goods or services, used on, or consumed by, patients is listed above. No other planners, members of the planning committee, content reviewers and/or anyone else in a position to control the content of this education activity have relevant financial relationships to disclose.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Each physician should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The University of Pittsburgh is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution.