Step by Step

INTRODUCTION

QUIZ

EVALUATION

CERTIFICATE

INTRODUCTION

Credit Hours: CME 1.00

Target Audience:

This activity is directed to physicians who take care of hospitalized children, medical students, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants working in the emergency room, intensive care unit, or hospital wards.

Educational Objectives:

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Review the Clinical report on management of neonates born at 35 weeks or greater with suspected or proven early onset bacterial sepsis.
  • Review the three assessment strategies for these infants and their strengths and weaknesses. 
  • Review Slab testing and how to use it for this risk stratification.

There is no educational content to this course. This course is designed to only administer the post-test and collect CME evaluations for the podcast associated with this training.
A Note From Dr. Tarchichi:
This series of podcasts were created to keep the busy physician of today informed and up to date on some of the most important diagnoses and issues we face every day in the care of hospitalized children. Please log in, complete a brief quiz, a course evaluation and get your CME credit. Thank you for listening and enjoy.

Suggested Additional Reading & Joint Accreditation Statement - Note: This Accreditation Statement Supersedes All Other Statements:

  • Karen M. Puopolo, William E. Benitz, Theoklis E. Zaoutis, COMMITTEE ON FETUS AND NEWBORN, COMMITTEE ON INFECTIOUS DISEASES, James Cummings, Sandra Juul, Ivan Hand, Eric Eichenwald, Brenda Poindexter, Dan L. Stewart, Susan W. Aucott, Jay P. Goldsmith, Kristi Watterberg, Carrie L. Byington, Yvonne A. Maldonado, Ritu Banerjee, Elizabeth D. Barnett, James D. Campbell, Jeffrey S. Gerber, Ruth Lynfield, Flor M. Munoz, Dawn Nolt, Ann-Christine Nyquist, Sean T. O’Leary, Mobeen H. Rathore, Mark H. Sawyer, William J. Steinbach, Tina Q. Tan; Management of Neonates Born at ≥35 0/7 Weeks’ Gestation With Suspected or Proven Early-Onset Bacterial Sepsis. Pediatrics December 2018; 142 (6): e20182894. 10.1542/peds.2018-2894


Joint Accreditation Statement: 

In support of improving patient care, the University of Pittsburgh is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.


The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.


Other health care professionals will receive a certificate of attendance confirming the number of contact hours commensurate with the extent of participation in this activity.

Authors:
Karen Puopolo, MD, PhD — Chief, Section on Newborn Medicine, Pennsylvania Hospital. Professor of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
Tony R. Tarchichi MD — Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC.) Paul C. Gaffney Diagnostic Referral Group
No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.
No other members of the planning committee, speakers, presenters, authors, content reviewers and/or anyone else in a position to control the content of this education activity have relevant financial relationships with any companies whose primary business is producing, marketing, selling, re-selling, or distributing healthcare products used by or on patients.

The University of Pittsburgh is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution.